Monday, July 15, 2019

July 15th in stamps Rembrandt, Rosetta Stone, Champollion


Here are some events that happened on July 15th. It could be an event or a person that died or was born on that day


1606 Born: Rembrandt, Dutch painter and etcher (d. 1669)


Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn (15 July 1606– 4 October 1669) was a Dutch draughtsman, painter and printmaker. An innovative and prolific master in three media, he is generally considered one of the greatest visual artists in the history of art and the most important in Dutch art history. Unlike most Dutch masters of the 17th century, Rembrandt's works depict a wide range of style and subject matter, from portraits and self-portraits to landscapes, genre scenes, allegorical and historical scenes, biblical and mythological themes as well as animal studies. His contributions to art came in a period of great wealth and cultural achievement that historians call the Dutch Golden Age, when Dutch art (especially Dutch painting), although in many ways antithetical to the Baroque style that dominated Europe, was extremely prolific and innovative, and gave rise to important new genres


Some stamps from  Germany, Cyprus, France and the Netherlands depicting Rembrandt or his works







1799 – The Rosetta Stone is found in the Egyptian village of Rosetta by French Captain Pierre-François Bouchard during Napoleon's Egyptian Campaign.

The Rosetta Stone is a granodiorite stele, rediscovered in the western world in 1799, inscribed with three versions of a decree issued at Memphis, Egypt, in 196 BC during the Ptolemaic dynasty on behalf of King Ptolemy V. The top and middle texts are in Ancient Egyptian using hieroglyphic script and demotic scripts, respectively, while the bottom is in Ancient Greek. As the decree has only minor differences between the three versions, the Rosetta Stone proved to be the key to deciphering Egyptian hieroglyphs, thereby opening a window into ancient Egyptian history

Below are a First Day Cover from Egypt as well as stamps from Egypt, France and Monaco depicting the Rosetta Stone as well as Jean-François Champollion who published his first breakthrough in the decipherment of the Rosetta hieroglyphs in 1822








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